51 Percent

Whether it's the environment, health, our children, politics or the arts, there's a women's perspective, and 51% is a show dedicated to that viewpoint. Host Jesse King talks to experts in their field for a ...more

Latest Episodes

February 28, 2022
#1701: Happy Birthday, Harriet Tubman | 51%

#1701: Happy Birthday, Harriet Tubman | 51%

On this week’s 51%, we speak with University at Albany professor Dr. Janell Hobson about the life and work of Harriet Tubman, and a new project with Ms. magazine to mark Tubman’s 200th birthday. We also speak with author Tracey Michae’l Lewis-Giggetts about her book Black Joy: Stories of Resistance, Resilience, and Restoration. Guests: Dr. Janell Hobson, UAlbany professor and editor of the The Harriet Tubman Bicentennial Project; Tracey Michae'l Lewis-Giggetts, author of Black Joy: Stories of Resistance, Resilience, and Restoration 51% is a national production of WAMC Northeast Public Radio. It's produced by Jesse King. Our executive producer is Dr. Alan Chartock, and our theme is "Lolita" by the Albany-based artist Girl Blue. Follow Along You’re listening to 51%, a WAMC production on women’s issues and experiences. Thanks for joining us, I’m Jesse King. When you think of prominent women in American history, who comes to mind? Susan B. Anthony? Rosa Parks? Harriett Tubman? Well, hopefully all three and more – but Harriet Tubman is perhaps one of the most popular female figures in American history, particularly Black history. In fact, the abolitionist won a popularity contest of sorts in a 2015 poll gaging which historic woman should be the new face of the $20 bill. A redesigned bill with her likeness is set to rollout by 2030. Growing up, I was primarily taught about Harriet Tubman’s work as a conductor on the Underground Railroad – but like all of us, there were many sides to her: a liberator, a nurse, a veteran of the Civil War, spy, suffragist, daughter, sister, mother, and friend. I thought it’d be nice to learn a little more about Tubman’s work, who she ...

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February 28, 2022
#1701: Happy Birthday, Harriet Tubman | 51%

#1701: Happy Birthday, Harriet Tubman | 51%

On this week’s 51%, we speak with University at Albany professor Dr. Janell Hobson about the life and work of Harriet Tubman, and a new project with Ms. magazine to mark Tubman’s 200th birthday. We also speak with author Tracey Michae’l Lewis-Giggetts about her book Black Joy: Stories of Resistance, Resilience, and Restoration. Guests: Dr. Janell Hobson, UAlbany professor and editor of the The Harriet Tubman Bicentennial Project; Tracey Michae'l Lewis-Giggetts, author of Black Joy: Stories of Resistance, Resilience, and Restoration 51% is a national production of WAMC Northeast Public Radio. It's produced by Jesse King. Our executive producer is Dr. Alan Chartock, and our theme is "Lolita" by the Albany-based artist Girl Blue. Follow Along You’re listening to 51%, a WAMC production on women’s issues and experiences. Thanks for joining us, I’m Jesse King. When you think of prominent women in American history, who comes to mind? Susan B. Anthony? Rosa Parks? Harriett Tubman? Well, hopefully all three and more – but Harriet Tubman is perhaps one of the most popular female figures in American history, particularly Black history. In fact, the abolitionist won a popularity contest of sorts in a 2015 poll gaging which historic woman should be the new face of the $20 bill. A redesigned bill with her likeness is set to rollout by 2030. Growing up, I was primarily taught about Harriet Tubman’s work as a conductor on the Underground Railroad – but like all of us, there were many sides to her: a liberator, a nurse, a veteran of the Civil War, spy, suffragist, daughter, sister, mother, and friend. I thought it’d be nice to learn a little more about Tubman’s work, who she ...

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February 28, 2022
#1701: Happy Birthday, Harriet Tubman | 51%

#1701: Happy Birthday, Harriet Tubman | 51%

On this week’s 51%, we speak with University at Albany professor Dr. Janell Hobson about the life and work of Harriet Tubman, and a new project with Ms. magazine to mark Tubman’s 200th birthday. We also speak with author Tracey Michae’l Lewis-Giggetts about her book Black Joy: Stories of Resistance, Resilience, and Restoration. Guests: Dr. Janell Hobson, UAlbany professor and editor of the The Harriet Tubman Bicentennial Project; Tracey Michae'l Lewis-Giggetts, author of Black Joy: Stories of Resistance, Resilience, and Restoration 51% is a national production of WAMC Northeast Public Radio. It's produced by Jesse King. Our executive producer is Dr. Alan Chartock, and our theme is "Lolita" by the Albany-based artist Girl Blue. Follow Along You’re listening to 51%, a WAMC production on women’s issues and experiences. Thanks for joining us, I’m Jesse King. When you think of prominent women in American history, who comes to mind? Susan B. Anthony? Rosa Parks? Harriett Tubman? Well, hopefully all three and more – but Harriet Tubman is perhaps one of the most popular female figures in American history, particularly Black history. In fact, the abolitionist won a popularity contest of sorts in a 2015 poll gaging which historic woman should be the new face of the $20 bill. A redesigned bill with her likeness is set to rollout by 2030. Growing up, I was primarily taught about Harriet Tubman’s work as a conductor on the Underground Railroad – but like all of us, there were many sides to her: a liberator, a nurse, a veteran of the Civil War, spy, suffragist, daughter, sister, mother, and friend. I thought it’d be nice to learn a little more about Tubman’s work, who she ...

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February 28, 2022 00:31:57
Episode Cover

#1701: Happy Birthday, Harriet Tubman | 51%

On this week’s 51%, we speak with University at Albany professor Dr. Janell Hobson about the life and work of Harriet Tubman, and a new project with Ms. magazine to mark Tubman’s 200th birthday. We also speak with author Tracey Michae’l Lewis-Giggetts about her book Black Joy: Stories of Resistance, Resilience, and Restoration. Guests: Dr. Janell Hobson, UAlbany professor and editor of the The Harriet Tubman Bicentennial Project; Tracey Michae'l Lewis-Giggetts, author of Black Joy: Stories of Resistance, Resilience, and Restoration 51% is a national production of WAMC Northeast Public Radio. It's produced by Jesse King. Our executive producer is Dr. Alan Chartock, and our theme is "Lolita" by the Albany-based artist Girl Blue. Follow Along You’re listening to 51%, a WAMC production on women’s issues and experiences. Thanks for joining us, I’m Jesse King. When you think of prominent women in American history, who comes to mind? Susan B. Anthony? Rosa Parks? Harriett Tubman? Well, hopefully all three and more – but Harriet Tubman is perhaps one of the most popular female figures in American history, particularly Black history. In fact, the abolitionist won a popularity contest of sorts in a 2015 poll gaging which historic woman should be the new face of the $20 bill. A redesigned bill with her likeness is set to rollout by 2030. Growing up, I was primarily taught about Harriet Tubman’s work as a conductor on the Underground Railroad – but like all of us, there were many sides to her: a liberator, a nurse, a veteran of the Civil War, spy, suffragist, daughter, sister, mother, and friend. I thought it’d be nice to learn a little more about Tubman’s work, who she ...

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February 18, 2022 00:29:09
#1700: Alice Green on

#1700: Alice Green on "We Who Believe In Freedom" | 51%

On this week's 51%, we sit down with Dr. Alice Green, founder and director of Albany’s Center for Law and Justice, to discuss her new book We Who Believe in Freedom: Activism and the Struggle for Social Justice. Guest: Dr. Alice Green, founder and executive director of the Center for Law and Justice; author of We Who Believe in Freedom: Activism and the Struggle for Social Justice 51% is a national production of WAMC Northeast Public Radio. It is produced by Jesse King. Our executive producer is Dr. Alan Chartock, and our theme is "Lolita" by the Albany-based artist Girl Blue. Follow Along You’re listening to 51%, a WAMC production dedicated to women’s issues and stories. Thanks for joining us, I’m Jesse King.  Our guest today is a longtime civil rights activist and icon in Albany, New York. Dr. Alice Green is the founder and executive director of the Center for Law and Justice, a non-profit organization that has called for criminal justice reform, including an end to mass incarceration and systemic oppression, since 1985.  Green herself has received several awards recognizing her activism in Albany, from organizations like NAACP, National Organization for Women, New York State Bar Association, and more. She earned her doctorate in criminal justice from SUNY’s University at Albany, as well as three master’s degrees in education, social work, and criminology. And late last year, she sought out a local Black press to publish her latest project: a part-memoir, part history of the city titled We Who Believe in Freedom: Activism and the Struggle for Social Justice. In it, Green examines her childhood in New York’s North Country, her activism in ...

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February 11, 2022 00:29:14
#1699: Shortlisted | 51%

#1699: Shortlisted | 51%

Sandra Day O’Connor became the first female Supreme Court Justice in 1981, but before that there was a long history of female candidates waiting in the wings. On this week’s 51%, we discuss the honors and limits of being shortlisted with the authors of Shortlisted: Women in the Shadows of the Supreme Court. We also take a look at President Biden’s shortlist, following his pledge to nominate the first Black woman to the Supreme Court. Guests: Renee Knake Jefferson and Hannah Brenner Johnson, authors of Shortlisted: Women in the Shadows of the Supreme Court 51% is a national production of WAMC Northeast Public Radio. It's produced by Jesse King. Our executive producer is Dr. Alan Chartock, and our theme is "Lolita" by the Albany-based artist Girl Blue. Follow Along You’re listening to 51%, a WAMC production dedicated to women’s issues and experiences. Thanks for joining us, I’m Jesse King.  With Associate Justice Stephen Breyer set to retire, President Biden has said he will tap his nominee to the U.S. Supreme Court by the end of February. The Democrat has also said his pick will be the first Black woman to fill the role, more than 40 years after the nomination of Sandra Day O’Connor, the first female Supreme Court justice, in 1981. When we talk about women in the Supreme Court, we tend to start with O’Connor — but as our guests today will tell us, there’s actually a long, untold history of women being considered, but ultimately passed over, for the nation’s highest court.  Renee Knake Jefferson and Hannah Brenner Johnson are the authors of Shortlisted: Women in the Shadows of the ...

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